WHAT TYPE OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCT DID YOU LAST THROW OUT?

blender
blender Part
blender Part
Product-Shadow
coffee maker
coffee maker Part
coffee maker Part
Product-Shadow
laptop
laptop Part
laptop Part
Product-Shadow
monitor
monitor Part
Product-Shadow
printer
printer Part
printer Part
Product-Shadow
smartphone
smartphone Part
Product-Shadow
toaster
toaster Part
toaster Part
Product-Shadow
tv
tv Part
Product-Shadow
vacuum cleaner
vacuum cleaner Part
vacuum cleaner Part
Product-Shadow
0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

It was this product

BACK

YOUR

BLENDER

Remember those pre-work, post-jog endorphins rushing through your body, and the sweet taste of your favourite protein shake on your sweaty lips? Mmmm, banana.

You and your old blender went through a lot.

But did you ever wonder what happened to it after you parted ways?

YOUR

COFFEE_MAKER

Remember those wholesome Saturdays, when you revelled in the fact that you didn’t go out the night before? A newspaper in hand, a tasty nutritious breakfast, and that delightfully warm cup of fresh coffee. That really was something to be smug about.

You and your old coffee maker went through a lot.

But did you ever wonder what happened to it after you parted ways?

YOUR

LAPTOP

Remember taking your laptop to every class, on every holiday, to the supermarket, over to your friend’s house and even out for dinner on a few occasions? You probably had stronger arms in those days.

You and your old laptop went through a lot.

But did you ever wonder what happened to it after you parted ways?

YOUR

MONITOR

Remember singing along to all of your favourite music videos back to back, in what was considered at the time incredibly high definition? So do your neighbours.

You and your old monitor went through a lot.

But did you ever wonder what happened to it after you parted ways?

YOUR

PRINTER

Remember the horrifying realisation that you hadn’t printed your boarding pass, less than 4 hours before your flight? Think of all the money you saved on fines at the airport.

You and your old printer went through a lot.

But did you ever wonder what happened to it after you parted ways?

YOUR

SMARTPHONE

Remember the constant battle for storage space, and the impossible decisions that had to be made - which photograph of me, should I delete?

You and your old smartphone went through a lot.

But did you ever wonder what happened to it after you parted ways?

YOUR

TOASTER

Remember those early mornings, the delicious smell of warm toast wafting through the air, and the first really big decision of the day - which topping do I fancy?

You and your old toaster went through a lot.

But did you ever wonder what happened to it after you parted ways?

YOUR

TV

Remember those lazy sundays, cosying up in front of your favourite show with a delicious takeaway glistening on the plate in front of you? If only every day was a Sunday.

You and your old tv went through a lot.

But did you ever wonder what happened to it after you parted ways?

YOUR

VACUUM_CLEANER

Remember that post spring-clean feeling of true self-worth, every surface in the house gleaming and not a speck of dust in sight? That yearly clean really was rewarding.

You and your old vacuum cleaner went through a lot.

But did you ever wonder what happened to it after you parted ways?

Hole

DRAG

A blender is probably the least durable consumer electronics product in your kitchen.

Kitchen blenders normally break down because they aren’t used properly.

The lifetime of blenders can probably be extended by better design and by helping make sure they get used properly.

Most discarded coffee makers can probably be fixed fairly easily – it may well just be problems with something simple, like a broken switch, or the result of limescale deposits.

Normally, only half of the materials in your coffee maker are recovered in the recycling process.

Coffee makers can contain toxic substances that include brominated flame retardants.

A laptop can contain almost all types of metals and other substances – up to 80% of all the elements of the periodic table. Most of these are currently lost, rather than being recycled.

The manufacturing processes involved in making a laptop pollute more than twice as much as all your years of using it.

The carbon footprint of a 15-inch laptop is equivalent to approx. 350 kg CO2. That’s about the same pollution as from driving a typical Danish car for more than 3000 km.

Indium is a scarce resource. Around 80% of the world’s indium goes into manufacturing LCD screens.

Your computer screen can contain toxic substances that include brominated flame retardants and mercury.

Many computer screens still work when they are thrown away.

About half of all the materials in a printer are lost during the recycling process.

About 25% of printers still work when they are thrown away.

Printers can contain toxic substances that include brominated flame retardants.

There are more mobile phones than people.

The manufacturing processes involved in making your smartphone pollute four times more than all your years of using it.

A smartphone can contain almost all types of metals and other substances – up to 80% of all the elements of the periodic table. At the moment, most of these are lost, rather than being recycled.

Toasters can contain toxic substances that include brominated flame retardants.

Many toasters still work when they are thrown away.

Using and cleaning your toaster properly is likely to increase its service life considerably.

An average household owns two televisions. TVs are one of the most commonly discarded consumer electronic products in the world.

Many TVs still work fine when they are thrown away.

Some flat-screen TVs can contain toxic substances that include brominated flame retardants and mercury.

Vacuum cleaners are the most commonly discarded household appliances. They are often thrown out because of issues that are easily fixable , such as a split hose or a faulty cord retractor.

On average, only half of the materials that make up a vacuum cleaner are recycled.

Around 70% of vacuum cleaners still work when they are thrown away.

Wire-01 Wire-02 Wire-03
Projected-Content Projected-Content Projected-Content Projected-Content Projected-Content Projected-Content Projected-Content Projected-Content
Projected-Light
Products-Back Products-Front
Projector

The truth is, your probably ended up here - in this huge mountain of electronic waste.

In 2016, 44.7 million tonnes of e-waste were generated globally, and this number is growing rapidly.

That’s the equivalent of 12 Eiffel Towers of consumer electronic products that get thrown away somewhere on the planet – every single day.

Around 80% of global electronic waste globally is thrown out in ways that are unaccounted for.

Of the 20% accounted for, only the base metals, iron, aluminium and copper, are normally recovered effectively. Geologically scarce and economically critical elements – gallium, tungsten, tantalum, cobalt, etc. – are lost in current recycling processes.

In their initial mining and refining, these elements have substantial environmental impacts, and in some cases are sourced from conflict zones.

That’s why it is important to keep consumer electronics products in use for as long as possible.

Unfortunately we don’t yet have the systems to make the most of our used electronic products. That’s why your ended up here.

Wouldn´t it be great to change this?

A a first step you can help us by sharing information about your own use of e e-products and your own ideas and preferences as a consumer. How could you see yourself taking part in a more "circular" system featuring a higher rate of product reuse and more efficient recovery of materials?

I would like to participate

Electronic products are everywhere, and they’re a huge part of our daily lives. In fact, there’s one in front of you right now.

On average we own 25 electronic products each, at any given time, ranging from compact devices like mobile phones to large household appliances like refrigerators and washing machines.

But what happens to all of these products, when we’re finished with them?

Let's take a closer look

Fill 1 Created with Sketch.
CLOSE

Towards a more sustainable use of resources in our electronics – benefiting people, the planet and the economy

The term “circular economy” describes an alternative system proposed to replace the current make–use–dispose systems, in order to ensure more sustainable management of the Earth’s resources. The idea is to enable products – or the materials from which they are made – to circulate within our society’s different systems for as long as possible, and to do this via better design, reuse, refurbishment, remanufacturing and recycling.

The “e-circle” project is an SDU lighthouse effort aimed at developing a knowledge platform for the circular economy and the management of end-of-life electrical and electronics products, which are otherwise known as e-waste. The “e-circle” facilitates the circular economy in the e-products sector by connecting key participants in the supply chains before, during and after the product ends its service life.

The project is led by SDU Life Cycle Engineering (LCE), an SDU centre that researches the strategic and sustainable development of societal infrastructure and technologies.

If you have any questions regarding the factual information used on the site, please contact Dmitry Zhilyaev via email: dmz@kbm.sdu.dk

Fill 1 Created with Sketch.
CLOSE

Take Action

As a first step toward building a sustainable future we would kindly ask you to share your personal experience and thoughts when using and discarding electronic products. The questionnaire is designed to help us get a better understanding of our role, our behaviour and our preferences. The result of the research will help us understand how use of electronic products can be organised in ways that lead to maximising or extending their useful life, along with more efficient recycling of such products once their useful life is over.
Thank you very much for contributing to this!

Click to get to the survey